APT PRESIDENT MICHAEL DA ROSA SPEAKS TO THE SCHOOL BOARD

2-8-17
1-11-17
12-12-16
11-9-16
10-17-16

ELECTION DIRECTIONS AND CANDIDATE STATEMENTS 2017-2018

MESSAGE FROM THE BARGAINING TEAM 1-19-17

Members of the Bargaining Team for the APT side met today to continue discussions on reopeners for bargaining topics with the district this upcoming year. The team discussed Articles 8 (Health & Welfare Benefits), 10 (Hours of Employment), and 12 (Class Size). The team also finished surveys that will soon be disseminated to members. The team will be meeting again sometime after the results from the survey are received. 

For the latest information, be sure to check out our new website: www.pomonateachers.com


Members of the APT Bargaining Team include Jason Albaugh, Erin Jackson, Dorothy Kim, Danielle Rasshan, and Chester Tadeja. APT President Michael da Rose and APT Executive Director Morgan Brown serve as advisors.

APT ELECTION RESULTS 2017

TENTATIVE AGREEMENT HAS PASSED

SEE VOTING RESULTS

Vote Tally

The new tentative agreement will put us on par with other school districts in our service area. For the first time in many years, the salary schedule is fixed to benefit members in the long run. This is not a stopgap temporary fix and points us to the future helping us retain teachers and preventing them from possibly moving to another school district! We want to keep our teachers here! Comparatively and reputably, PUSD teachers are some of the most well trained teachers in the area! The Bargaining Team is scheduled to return to negotiations in reopeners starting perhaps in January. Look for continuous updates on their progress. We also want to hear from you! Be on the lookout for ways in which you can contribute, as we value and need your input!

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Voting for the Tentative Agreement has completed. The TA has passed. A total of 1,057 people voted: 716 voted YES and 341 voted NO, which translates to 68% YES votes and 32% NO votes. Thank you for this great accomplishment! I want to thank Ken Lambright, Elections Chair as well as the Elections Committee for their prompt tallying of the votes. Lastly, I want to thank the members of the Bargaining Team: Jason Albaugh, Erin Jackson, Dorothy Kim, Danielle Rasshan, and Chester Tadeja. I also want to thank Executive Director Morgan Brown. Thank you again for your hard work and commitment to the work we do.

Congratulations Bargaining Team! The Tentative Agreement has passed! A record number of votes totaling 1,057 voters voted for the TA. See the message below from the APT President about specifics and a thank you message from him.

Yes on 55! Voters Approve School Funding

APT supports California Proposition 55, helping to keep your local PUSD schools funded.

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Our Teachers, Our Strength

APT is looking toward the future to Attract, Support, Retain, & Reward the best and brightest talent, leading Pomona’s kids to their greatest potential.

APT GOALS

PUSD Teachers Earn a LOT Less

PUSD Teachers earn $10,000 – $20,000 less a year than comparable teachers in neighboring districts. Let PUSD leadership know what you think about that!

BE HEARD!

PUSD Committed to Offering Competitive Compensation

“Pomona is committed to . . . offering competitive compensation and benefits through collaborative negotiations based on mutual respect” – Darren Knowles, PUSD Assistant Superintendant

Mr. Knowles Message

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ASSOCIATED POMONA TEACHERS

WHAT APT DOES FOR YOU!

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Welcome!

Who are we?: Associated Pomona Teachers (APT) is a non-profit corporation, organized exclusively as a professional school employees’ association for educational purposes.
APT is a chartered affiliate of the California Teachers Association (CTA) and the National Education Association (NEA).
 
The Purposes for which the Association was formed are:
 
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Know Your Rights!

Your Right To Be Represented 

The Association is the exclusive representative for the teachers, counselors, nurses, psychologists, adapted p.e., and language/ speech specialists in our District and therefore the only employee organization authorized to represent individual members in certain situations.

What are those situations in which you may want or need representation?

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In Time of Need, What to do?

♦ You wish to report a violation of  the contract:

Contact your Grievance Rep or the  Chair of the PR&R Committee.

♦ You wish to recommend policy positions for APT to take on political candidates, educational,  legislative, or bargaining issues:

Contact your APT Faculty Rep,  Committee Chairperson, CTA State Council Rep, or APT Board of Directors Member.

Learn More

ELSEWHERE IN CALIFORNIA . . . 

WIN-WIN IBB NEGOTIATIONS REWARDING TEACHERS

YUBA CITY TEACHERS SETTLE AND GET RESPECT
September 2016

Yuba City teachers fight for 11.1% salary increase . . .

Educators in Yuba City received support, love and respect during a seven-day strike that ended in settlement on Sept. 19. The strike mobilized and gave voice to students, parents and the community.

Yuba City Teachers Association members voted 506-15 to ratify an agreement that allows educators more collaboration time and three professional development days. They gain more input into the Local Control Accountability Plan and allocation of Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) funds to help students with high needs.

The new contract stipulates an 11.1 percent salary increase over a three-year period beginning 2015-16. Previously, district teachers on average earned 13 percent ($9,494) less than the statewide average for their peers, which led many to leave for better-paying jobs, hurting students’ education.

“In terms of retaining teachers, longevity pay will be permanently placed on the salary schedule, which hopefully will encourage experienced teachers to stay in our community,” says YCTA President Dina Luetgens. “In terms of respect, we have a written understanding that gives us a seat at the table so our voice on strategic decisions will be heard, especially in how state monies received through the LCFF are spent on programs to improve student achievement.”

Some 71 percent of Yuba City students are considered having high needs (low-income students, foster youth and English learners), which means the district should receive an extra $21 million annually at full funding of LCFF in three or four years. YCTA argued that to give students the education they deserve, some of the revenue should go to across-the-board raises to help recruit and retain quality teachers. Last year alone, Yuba City lost 10 percent of its teachers because of the lack of respect from the district.

ALAMEDA TEACHERS CONTRACT RATIFIED BY SCHOOL BOARD
November, 2016

Alameda Unified School District board unanimously . . . 

ALAMEDA, CA — The Alameda Unified School District (AUSD) Board of Education unanimously approved a new contract with the Alameda Education Association (AEA) at its board meeting Tuesday night.

Under the terms of the two-year agreement, the salary schedule for AEA members (the district’s teachers, nurses, counselors, and speech and language pathologists) will increase 4 percent starting December 1, 2016.

“I am so pleased that once again the two teams were able to come together to create an agreement that works for all,” said Superintendent Sean McPhetridge. “I realize this takes both tenacity and an ability to compromise – two qualities that I admire greatly in my colleagues here in AUSD. I look forward to the continued collaboration of our two teams.”

The district and union also agreed to provisions that will:

  • Ease implementation of full day kindergarten
  • Schedule the first 14 days of school as minimum (short) days for kindergarteners
  • Set up committees to study teacher salaries, budget priorities, and best practices for instructing students who receive special education
  • Create a joint AUSD-AEA Academic Committee to deepen district/teacher collaboration on choosing and evaluating instructional materials and professional development
  • Increase flexibility for using leave time
  • Give the children of AEA members the same priority for enrolling at the school site where they work as children who live in that neighborhood

ESCONDIDO TEACHERS STRIKE CONTRACT DEAL

Escondido school teachers vote to approve 9%  . . . 

Ater a year of stalemate, the Escondido Union High School District and its teachers union have reached a tentative contract agreement.

The three-year deal, set to take effect July 1, would raise teacher compensation by 6 percent this year and by 3 percent for 2016-17, said Escondido Union High School District Superintendent Steve Boyle. Pay and benefits for the final year, 2017-18, remain open to renegotiation.

Teachers will get back pay dating to July 2015. And the agreement will bump compensation an additional 2.5 percent by removing the first step of the salary schedule, in order to attract and retain teachers, Boyle said.

“It is my hope that our tentative agreement will be providing a very competitive compensation package for our teachers, and we can all continue to focus on providing a quality education to every student in our district,” he said.

LEADERSHIP AND MEMBERS FINDING COMMON GROUND

WEST SACRAMENTO TEACHERS OK PACT
October 2016

West Sacramento teachers agree to 8.2% salary increase . . .

October 2016 – Members of the Washington Teachers Association (WTA) ratified a new contract agreement Oct. 5 that provides more than 8.2 percent in salary increases over three years — making it easier for Washington Unified School District in West Sacramento to recruit and retain educators.

“We’re really hoping that this agreement will make our district more attractive to teachers so that they won’t transfer out,” says Don Stauffer, president of the 425-member WTA, which endured a year of difficult negotiations.

The school board was expected to ratify the deal on Oct. 13. Raises amount to 2.2 percent for the 2015-16 school year (plus a one-time 1 percent bonus), 4 percent for this school year, and 2 percent next year.

DOS PALOS SCHOOL, TEACHERS REACH TENTATIVE CONTRACT
October, 2016

School district and teacher’s union agree to 9% . . . 

A possible teachers strike in Dos Palos has been avoided after the school district and teachers union reached a tentative agreement through contract mediation.

The agreement reached by the Dos Palos-Oro Loma School District and Dos Palos-Oro Loma Teachers Association, or DPOLTA, would give teachers the equivalent of about a 9 percent increase over two years, according to a school district news release.

“We reach this agreement with our teachers with a sense of relief and high hopes for our future together,” Superintendent William Spalding said. “We have challenges ahead, and this agreement allows all of us to focus on our kids and improved student achievement without distraction.”

The school board is expected to vote on the contract Thursday.

DPOLTA President Marty Thompson said 93 percent of the union on Friday voted in favor of the tentative contract.

 

“Hopefully, it’s done Thursday,” Thompson said. “Now we’re putting our effort into (campaigning) for board members to be elected so this doesn’t happen again.”

According to the release, teachers will receive a 3 percent increase for the 2015-16 school year, retroactive to July 1, 2015. They also will receive a 4 percent increase for the 2016-17 school year, retroactive to July 1, 2016.

In addition to the increases, $3,000 per year will be added to teacher salaries after the 28th year of service, and an additional $3,000 per year after the 30th year.

All teachers will receive an extra $1,000 to their annual benefit cap, bringing total district benefits contributions to $12,000 per employee, according to the release. The yearly raises in addition to the benefit cap increase makes the total increase a little more than 9 percent, Spalding confirmed Monday.

Spalding said the contract helps improve the district’s ability to compete for and retain teachers. He acknowledged that a long impasse between the school district and teachers union became a significant topic in the community.

Read more here: http://www.mercedsunstar.com/news/article108856362.html#storylink=cpy

UPLAND UNIFIED, TEACHERS UNION, REACH TENTATIVE AGREEMENT ON CONTRACT

Upland schools agree to all contractual issues . . . 

UPLAND >> After months of contention, Upland Unified and its teachers union have agreed on a new contract.

“The Upland Unified School District has announced it has reached a tentative agreement with the Upland Teachers Association on all outstanding contractual issues, subject to ratification by both parties,” a press release issued by the district Friday evening reads.

Both the union and school board still need to sign off on the agreement.

The district and the UTA began contract negotiations in the fall, but declared an impasse on Sept. 25. Since then, teachers have repeatedly protested outside district headquarters and outside school board meetings and issued a vote of no confidence against Superintendent Nancy Kelly.

Both the district and the union took to the Opinion page of the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin to argue their cases before the public:

“If we are going to commit public dollars to an ongoing expense, we must identify the means to pay for it,” Superintendent Nancy Kelly’s op-ed piece, published Feb. 5, reads in part. “We believe our current proposal does just that by establishing reasonable cost controls on employee health benefits. Without having cost controls in place, we believe we would be committing UUSD to another cycle of deficit spending. We do not believe that would be a responsible course to take, especially given the hard work and sacrifice of our entire school community to balance UUSD’s budget.”

Upland Unified was running a $9 million budget deficit as recently as the 2013-14 school year.

How the district would contain health benefit costs was the main sticking point between the two sides, according to Debbie Glenn, a government and economics teacher at Upland High and the lead negotiator for the UTA.

“The UUSD proposal would have teachers pay increasing costs on health insurance with no consideration for cost of living, inflation or salary adjustments,” Glenn’s op-ed piece, published Feb. 10, read in part. “UUSD refuses to take into consideration any other options that could contain health insurance costs while also providing some protection for employees from unlimited escalating costs.”

How the two sides resolved this and other differences will be revealed before the school board votes on the contract, the district’s promised in their Friday evening press release.